Tag Archive: Aquaman


Cullen Bunn’s name certainly wasn’t foreign to me over the last few years, but I think it was about the time that he launched Fearless Defenders that I really started noticing him; adorable archeological lesbian romances and Dani Moonstar being a badass will do that. I kind of missed the boat with that title but his name stuck with me and when I heard Marvel was giving Magneto his own series, I was definitely intrigued. Magneto #1 got a rare A- from me and hooked me on the series just as Bunn was announced on a new Godzilla series featuring my favorite kaiju, Biollante. Within a month it seemed like Bunn was everywhere.

Mixing a comic writer’s restraint with a novelist’s lyricism, I found Bunn to be a writer who never gives you exactly what you expect. A Magneto series that’s actually a crime comic, a new take on an old horror standby, an all-ages title from the man who wrote Army of Darkness, there’s always an angle. It gives the impression of a man whose mind is always churning and his output certainly supports that. So when it was announced that he would be taking on two DC A-Listers, I knew it was getting past time we gave you nice people a look behind the curtain, after all Magneto is consistently one of our best read reviews.

Mr. Bunn was kind enough to talk with us and to give some intriguing and honest answers about what’s to come for his impressive slate of comics and what elements of a story grab his interest. Continue reading

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The New Year’s 52: Aquaman

In the course of talking to comic creators this year, I started to think about their unique talents and what I think they would be best suited to. Inspired by all kinds of wonderful ideas I’ve seen online and heard from creators, I’ve put together my New 52. These are the 52 books I would publish if DC’s offerings were up to me and, as my friends and I have had a good time discussing them, I thought I would share them with you.

I tried to consider the actual feasibility of these titles, not only in the sense of immediate sales but in their ability to expand DC’s brand long-term. I also recognize that this is a dramatically simplified version of what DC actually has to do. As such, I made a couple of rules for myself.

First, as I don’t have the same knowledge of the creators’ availability and timeliness as an actual editor, I decided that I would allow myself access to any writer currently working in comics, but that I could only assign a creator to one book. Second, I tried not to put a writer on the same book that they’ve already worked on, though some were moved to similar concepts or allowed to expand short work they’ve already done. Finally, while an actual relaunch might do well to include some new books, I limited myself to preexisting titles and IPs for this project.

I’d love to hear your thoughts, on why I’m right, why I clearly screwed up, who should be illustrating the series, etc. But, regardless, I hope you enjoy.

Though DC has made admirable strides in rehabilitating Aquaman’s image since they revived Arthur Curry, the King of the Seas remains a point of skepticism for many comic readers. But despite that bad reputation he’s been saddled with, Aquaman remains a personal favorite of mine and, as one of DC’s oldest heroes and a founder of the Justice League, I consider it something of a duty to give Aquaman a place at DC befitting his stature. So if that duty fell to me how would I go about carrying it out?

Well, it would take something big. And it would have to be something lasting, something that would really demonstrate the character’s potential rather than just a flash in the pan. But after three years of Geoff Johns, what writer could handle that responsibility?

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In the course of talking to comic creators this year, I started to think about their unique talents and what I think they would be best suited to. Inspired by all kinds of wonderful ideas I’ve seen online and heard from creators, I’ve put together my New 52. These are the 52 books I would publish if DC’s offerings were up to me and, as my friends and I have had a good time discussing them, I thought I would share them with you.

I tried to consider the actual feasibility of these titles, not only in the sense of immediate sales but in their ability to expand DC’s brand long-term. I also recognize that this is a dramatically simplified version of what DC actually has to do. As such, I made a couple of rules for myself.

First, as I don’t have the same knowledge of the creators’ availability and timeliness as an actual editor, I decided that I would allow myself access to any writer currently working in comics, but that I could only assign a creator to one book. Second, I tried not to put a writer on the same book that they’ve already worked on, though some were moved to similar concepts or allowed to expand short work they’ve already done. Finally, while an actual relaunch might do well to include some new books, I limited myself to preexisting titles and IPs for this project.

I’d love to hear your thoughts, on why I’m right, why I clearly screwed up, who should be illustrating the series, etc. But, regardless, I hope you enjoy.

Ever since its first appearance in The Brave and the Bold #28, the Justice League of America has been torn between two principles, that the team should function as a showcase for heroes without other representation and that this was a collection of DC’s greatest heroes. The core Justice League title already provides a place for some of DC’s greats to be recognized as the best and brightest the universe has to offer, but every once in a while there are threats that need a greater show of force…
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In the course of talking to comic creators this year, I started to think about their unique talents and what I think they would be best suited to. Inspired by all kinds of wonderful ideas I’ve seen online and heard from creators, I’ve put together my New 52. These are the 52 books I would publish if DC’s offerings were up to me and, as my friends and I have had a good time discussing them, I thought I would share them with you.

I tried to consider the actual feasibility of these titles, not only in the sense of immediate sales but in their ability to expand DC’s brand long-term. I also recognize that this is a dramatically simplified version of what DC actually has to do. As such, I made a couple of rules for myself.

First, as I don’t have the same knowledge of the creators’ availability and timeliness as an actual editor, I decided that I would allow myself access to any writer currently working in comics, but that I could only assign a creator to one book. Second, I tried not to put a writer on the same book that they’ve already worked on, though some were moved to similar concepts or allowed to expand short work they’ve already done. Finally, while an actual relaunch might do well to include some new books, I limited myself to preexisting titles and IPs for this project.

I’d love to hear your thoughts, on why I’m right, why I clearly screwed up, who should be illustrating the series, etc. But, regardless, I hope you enjoy.

Team books have long been a way for publishers to make some of their less popular characters viable. The Justice League’s charter actually included rules that prevented certain heroes (characters with their own books) from joining. However, in doing so, you do lose the ability to hear different writers’ voices for those characters and run the risk of a great character being eclipsed by a writer’s favorite or overshadowing their peers.

While this may be a necessity for certain IPs, there are some characters who are more popular but are stuck in limbo. Those who can’t support their own ongoing, those whose sales numbers don’t live up to their reputations. Team books are a great way to give characters a platform, but for those who a publisher wants to push, I think the super -hero team-up is a better model, and I know a pair of characters who I think DC should be pushing.

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Tony Bedard has been a presence in comics since the early 90s, working for a huge number of publishers in nearly as many roles. Bedard excels at writing clever and engaging comics that often explore the edges of their universes, where his ideas are free to grow.

Bedard currently writes Supergirl for DC and, in reviewing that series, I realized how interesting it would be to talk to him for the site. It took a while to find a time, but I was able to sit down with Tony at Special Edition: NYC to talk about Supergirl, editing, and even superhero movies. I hope you’ll enjoy hearing from him as much as I did.

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Review: Aquaman #26

Aquaman 26

As part of a rare breed of comic nerd, I will happily take any opportunity to proclaim my love for Aquaman. Sure, the world thinks he’s the worst member of the Justice League, but Aquaman’s awesome, capable of all the depth and power of the sea itself.

So I was torn when the New 52 launched the first new Aquaman comic in years. On one hand, I was particularly tired of Geoff Johns’ style of storytelling at the time and his villains bored me to death. On the other, here was a writer who not only loved and understood Aquaman but propelled him to the top of the sales charts. For the first time, the word got out that it’s ok to like Aquaman. That’s why I felt so weird dropping the series.

I may go back and read it in trade (the way it was meant to be read), but with a tight comics budget, I just couldn’t justify picking it up every month. Perhaps, I thought, I’ll return to Aquaman someday, some day when the currents change.

Well that day is today.
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All-New X-Factor

On the last day of New York Comic Con, I had the very good fortune to sit down with Peter David to talk about his long and storied career in the world of comics.

Mr. David has been writing comics for the better part of thirty years and has worked on all manner of projects; from cult classics like Young Justice or his trademark X-Factor to lengthy runs on some of the industry’s biggest titles like Aquaman and The Incredible Hulk. He’s also found success as a novelist and a screenwriter.

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Aquaman Time and Tide 1

One of DC’s four Golden Age heroes to survive to the modern-day, Aquaman is undoubtedly the one that gets the worst rap. The legacy of the Superfriends remains strong and most people still think of him as a joke. But for all the bad press he gets, Aquaman has endured for over seventy years, often well received even during periods that his Justice League comrades would rather forget.

In the mid-nineties, DC was chasing the dark and gritty trend. Superman died, Batman was broken, Wonder Woman replaced, the Green Lantern fell from grace, Wonder Woman flipped burgers, the Titans fell apart, and Wonder Woman received many a wedgie. And though Aquaman was hardly immune to the fashion of the day, quite appropriately, he found a way to swim with the current.

While Batman was bogged down in an endless series of crossovers and Superman wandered through every hairstyle, color scheme, and state of being that the writers could think to give him, Aquaman was given to Peter David, who began the longest run of Aquaman comics to date.

Today we’ll start examining the second underwater mini-series that David penned, and the first to feature Aquaman in a starring role: Time and Tide.

In short, if you thought Geoff Johns was the first one to make Aquaman cool, it’s about time you took a look at the history of Atlantis. Continue reading

For Great Justice!

justice-league-08

Welcome to 2013, everyone! DC announced a while back that they’re planning to release a Justice League movie in 2015. That’s only two years away now! As you might have guessed that means that the film has had a quietly building typhoon of rumor and speculation around it ever since the announcement. So, being the unoriginal egotist that I am, I thought I would give you my prescription for a Justice League film for 2015. Continue reading