Tag Archive: Wonder Woman


2118239-superman_batman_christmasHello again, friends. The holidays are upon us and it’s the giving season once more. Comics are a tricky business at this time of year. There’s always a deluge of books to chose from when buying for yourself and buying for someone else is always a difficult task, especially if you’re not quite as knowledgable as your intended recipient.

Happy HolidaysWell, worry not! Here are nine more excellent comics you may not have thought of. This selection should be generally accessible at your Local Comic Shop or easily located online and attempts to appeal to most, if not all, readers without rehashing the same tired best-sellers list.

It’s worth mentioning that there are tons of excellent comics that I simply haven’t gotten around to reading, but I wanted to feel confident that you were getting the best I could recommend and, as such, only comics I have personal experience with are featured here. I’ve tried to give a pretty wide range of comics, but, if you feel like your interests or the interests of the intended recipient aren’t adequately represented here, feel free to let me know in comments and I’ll try to see if I can’t come up with something.

You can also check out either of my other gift guides for more suggestions.

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The New Year’s 52: Wonders

In the course of talking to comic creators this year, I started to think about their unique talents and what I think they would be best suited to. Inspired by all kinds of wonderful ideas I’ve seen online and heard from creators, I’ve put together my New 52. These are the 52 books I would publish if DC’s offerings were up to me and, as my friends and I have had a good time discussing them, I thought I would share them with you.

I tried to consider the actual feasibility of these titles, not only in the sense of immediate sales but in their ability to expand DC’s brand long-term. I also recognize that this is a dramatically simplified version of what DC actually has to do. As such, I made a couple of rules for myself.

First, as I don’t have the same knowledge of the creators’ availability and timeliness as an actual editor, I decided that I would allow myself access to any writer currently working in comics, but that I could only assign a creator to one book. Second, I tried not to put a writer on the same book that they’ve already worked on, though some were moved to similar concepts or allowed to expand short work they’ve already done. Finally, while an actual relaunch might do well to include some new books, I limited myself to preexisting titles and IPs for this project.

I’d love to hear your thoughts, on why I’m right, why I clearly screwed up, who should be illustrating the series, etc. But, regardless, I hope you enjoy.

There is a question for DC, a question that defines eras. It is a question that seems ever to go deeper. Just when you think you’ve solved it you turn around and it’s staring you in the face again. Every iteration of the DC Universe must give an answer eventually and, with only a few days left, it’s time for the New Year’s 52 to answer four very simple words.

Who is Donna Troy?

Sins_of_Youth_Wonder_Girls_Vol_1_1

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In the course of talking to comic creators this year, I started to think about their unique talents and what I think they would be best suited to. Inspired by all kinds of wonderful ideas I’ve seen online and heard from creators, I’ve put together my New 52. These are the 52 books I would publish if DC’s offerings were up to me and, as my friends and I have had a good time discussing them, I thought I would share them with you.

I tried to consider the actual feasibility of these titles, not only in the sense of immediate sales but in their ability to expand DC’s brand long-term. I also recognize that this is a dramatically simplified version of what DC actually has to do. As such, I made a couple of rules for myself.

First, as I don’t have the same knowledge of the creators’ availability and timeliness as an actual editor, I decided that I would allow myself access to any writer currently working in comics, but that I could only assign a creator to one book. Second, I tried not to put a writer on the same book that they’ve already worked on, though some were moved to similar concepts or allowed to expand short work they’ve already done. Finally, while an actual relaunch might do well to include some new books, I limited myself to preexisting titles and IPs for this project.

I’d love to hear your thoughts, on why I’m right, why I clearly screwed up, who should be illustrating the series, etc. But, regardless, I hope you enjoy.

While it largely alienated the existing fan base, if there’s one thing Brian Azzerello’s Wonder Woman did, it’s that it made Wonder Woman a major seller for DC again. Alongside books like Animal Man and Batman, Wonder Woman was one of the consistent stand outs of the New 52 for many. In considering how I would relaunch DC’s titles, I couldn’t help but think that I had to repeat that success, even if I should like to appeal a little more to long-time fans.

We need a Wonder Woman who can appeal to a mass audience while retaining what makes her unique, and we need a writer with both the skill and the reputation to ensure its success. If Wonder Woman is going to stand up with the heavy hitters of the New Year’s 52, we’re going to need a show of force.

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In the course of talking to comic creators this year, I started to think about their unique talents and what I think they would be best suited to. Inspired by all kinds of wonderful ideas I’ve seen online and heard from creators, I’ve put together my New 52. These are the 52 books I would publish if DC’s offerings were up to me and, as my friends and I have had a good time discussing them, I thought I would share them with you.

I tried to consider the actual feasibility of these titles, not only in the sense of immediate sales but in their ability to expand DC’s brand long-term. I also recognize that this is a dramatically simplified version of what DC actually has to do. As such, I made a couple of rules for myself.

First, as I don’t have the same knowledge of the creators’ availability and timeliness as an actual editor, I decided that I would allow myself access to any writer currently working in comics, but that I could only assign a creator to one book. Second, I tried not to put a writer on the same book that they’ve already worked on, though some were moved to similar concepts or allowed to expand short work they’ve already done. Finally, while an actual relaunch might do well to include some new books, I limited myself to preexisting titles and IPs for this project.

I’d love to hear your thoughts, on why I’m right, why I clearly screwed up, who should be illustrating the series, etc. But, regardless, I hope you enjoy.

Ever since its first appearance in The Brave and the Bold #28, the Justice League of America has been torn between two principles, that the team should function as a showcase for heroes without other representation and that this was a collection of DC’s greatest heroes. The core Justice League title already provides a place for some of DC’s greats to be recognized as the best and brightest the universe has to offer, but every once in a while there are threats that need a greater show of force…
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In the course of talking to comic creators this year, I started to think about their unique talents and what I think they would be best suited to. Inspired by all kinds of wonderful ideas I’ve seen online and heard from creators, I’ve put together my New 52. These are the 52 books I would publish if DC’s offerings were up to me and, as my friends and I have had a good time discussing them, I thought I would share them with you.

I tried to consider the actual feasibility of these titles, not only in the sense of immediate sales but in their ability to expand DC’s brand long-term. I also recognize that this is a dramatically simplified version of what DC actually has to do. As such, I made a couple of rules for myself.

First, as I don’t have the same knowledge of the creators’ availability and timeliness as an actual editor, I decided that I would allow myself access to any writer currently working in comics, but that I could only assign a creator to one book. Second, I tried not to put a writer on the same book that they’ve already worked on, though some were moved to similar concepts or allowed to expand short work they’ve already done. Finally, while an actual relaunch might do well to include some new books, I limited myself to preexisting titles and IPs for this project.

I’d love to hear your thoughts, on why I’m right, why I clearly screwed up, who should be illustrating the series, etc. But, regardless, I hope you enjoy.

Team books have long been a way for publishers to make some of their less popular characters viable. The Justice League’s charter actually included rules that prevented certain heroes (characters with their own books) from joining. However, in doing so, you do lose the ability to hear different writers’ voices for those characters and run the risk of a great character being eclipsed by a writer’s favorite or overshadowing their peers.

While this may be a necessity for certain IPs, there are some characters who are more popular but are stuck in limbo. Those who can’t support their own ongoing, those whose sales numbers don’t live up to their reputations. Team books are a great way to give characters a platform, but for those who a publisher wants to push, I think the super -hero team-up is a better model, and I know a pair of characters who I think DC should be pushing.

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In the course of talking to comic creators this year, I started to think about their unique talents and what I think they would be best suited to. Inspired by all kinds of wonderful ideas I’ve seen online and heard from creators, I’ve put together my New 52. These are the 52 books I would publish if DC’s offerings were up to me and, as my friends and I have had a good time discussing them, I thought I would share them with you.

I tried to consider the actual feasibility of these titles, not only in the sense of immediate sales but in their ability to expand DC’s brand long-term. I also recognize that this is a dramatically simplified version of what DC actually has to do. As such, I made a couple of rules for myself.

First, as I don’t have the same knowledge of the creators’ availability and timeliness as an actual editor, I decided that I would allow myself access to any writer currently working in comics, but that I could only assign a creator to one book. Second, I tried not to put a writer on the same book that they’ve already worked on, though some were moved to similar concepts or allowed to expand short work they’ve already done. Finally, while an actual relaunch might do well to include some new books, I limited myself to preexisting titles and IPs for this project.

I’d love to hear your thoughts, on why I’m right, why I clearly screwed up, who should be illustrating the series, etc. But, regardless, I hope you enjoy.

Wonder Woman is one of the great comic characters, but while fans each have their personal favorite Wonder Woman, it’s rare to find a particular run that receives near universal acclaim. There is one exception; it seems almost everybody loves Greg Rucka’s Wonder Woman.

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Welcome back parents of the geeky and geek-adjacent variety. I got a lot of attention on my last Geek Parenting article so I’m back to offer a few more suggestions for those looking to support their double-digit Supermen and Wonder Women.

This list is once again going to look at books I’d suggest for nerds at that in-between age of 10 to 15.

This time we’re going to look at a couple of old classics that are currently out of print but should be easily available online or at comic conventions.

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photo 1Following Marvel’s Next Big Thing, room 1E19 was turned over to a very different sort of panel. At once more important but less serious, Reimagining the Female Hero was my favorite panel at Special Edition: NYC and, judging from the reactions I’ve seen, I get the sense I wasn’t alone in that.

In a stark inversion of horror stories from previous conventions where feminist panels were trolled by attendees waiting out more traditional fare, I noticed many fans sticking around from The Next Big Thing. In fact, despite taking place in the same room as DC and Marvel’s offerings, the panel gave us reason to hope and easily held its own in terms of attendance.

Of course, it didn’t hurt that the panel had some pretty excellent creators. The line-up included Jenny Frison, a talented cover artist for series including Revival and Red Sonja; Emanuela Lupacchino, the artist on DC’s Supergirl and the Superman: Lois Lane one-shot; Marguerite Bennett, the writer of Superman: Lois Lane and Batgirl #25 and #30; Gail Simone, feminist icon and writer on Batgirl; and Amy Reeder, the artist behind Madame Xanadu and Rocket Girl, who arrived from her dedicated panel a short while into the discussion.

It’s also worth mentioning that the panel had an excellent moderator in the form of Professor Ben Saunders of the University of Oregon. While I hesitate to devote too much praise to the only man involved with the panel, Professor Saunders did an excellent job of keeping the focus on his panelists, encouraging their relevant digressions, and recognizing their celebrity while keeping the mood light yet respectful.

In short I left the room with a greater respect for everyone involved. Continue reading

Review: Wonder Woman #23

Wonder Woman 23

Brian Azzarello’s tenure on Wonder Woman has been a controversial and complex one, and as the title completes its second year it shows no signs of stopping.

What has he done this time? Is it worth seeing for myself? Will I fall asleep atop a stack of tear-stained Greg Rucka trades tonight? The answers to all that and more within. Continue reading

WW Poster

Lately I’ve noticed a trend in many of the blogs and writers I follow. In the last few weeks, and especially since SDCC, I’ve heard a number of complaints from some very smart people about the insistence that Wonder Woman is a tricky or difficult character to bring to the screen.

I actually agree with this. I think that Wonder Woman’s profile actually hurts her chances of receiving a movie. After all, the average movie-goer knows surprisingly little about her, and yet she’s so famous that she has to sell tickets (and therefore is unlikely to buck hollywood trends). Likewise, she has the entirety of the feminist movement on her shoulders. Women as a whole are subjected to such high and conflicting standards in our society, and Wonder Woman’s struggle to find her way to the box office mirrors this perfectly.

But, I’m just one person. In fact, I am a male person. What’s more, I’m a male person who, while he generally likes Wonder Woman comics, isn’t a die-hard fan of the character like many of those disagreeing with me are. So, on Saturday, I decided to put my money where my mouth was and see how hard it would be to write a treatment for a Wonder Woman movie.

I still strongly advocate for a Justice League movie starring Diana, but if Wondy were to have her own stand-alone picture, I would do it like this:

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